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Local History

First Board of Trade

London's first Board of Trade was organized on April 22, 1857 at the Mechanics' Institute with Adam Hope as its first president.  42 residents signed the constitution and gave their names as subscribers for the amount of one pound annually.    In 1922, the Board of Trade changed its name to the Chamber of Commerce. 

St. George's Society Hosts First Dinner

The first dinner of the St. George's Society was held on April 23, 1847 at Balkwill's Hotel on the southwest corner of Dundas and Talbot streets (now the site of the Budweiser Gardens). 

Sheep for Sale!

On March 24, 1827, the first known commercial advertisement from London appears in the Gore Gazette of Ancaster.  George Jervis Goodhue (1799-1870), stated he would have 250 young sheep by August 1 which he would barter with cashless settlers for "Salts of Lye" at the rate of "three dollars per hundred."  Goodhue eventually became one of the richest men in London.  When he died, his estate was worth $650,000.  

Happy St. Paddy's Day

An advertisement in an 1827 issue of the Gore Gazette (Ancaster) , reads as follows - "Hotel in New Town of London - the subscriber having erected and licensed as an inn, a commodious two-storey frame building on Dundas Street...the hotel is within a few rods of the superb building now erecting in the town as a jail and courthouse for the London district, has the best stabling accommodations and is in every respect well qualified to afford comfort and convenience to the public."  At 5 o'clock on March 17, 1835, a formal St.

50 Years of Unionized Electrical Workers

On March 2nd, 1957, Members of London Local 120, International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, celebrated  their 50th anniversary at the Odd Fellows Temple on Dundas Street.   Workers had formed the local at the London Electric Co. which operated a steam-generated power plant on York Street near the Thames River, feeding direct current to the city.   

Founder of London's Italian Community Dies

110 years ago, Carmelo Paladino passed away on March 10th, 1907 at the family residence at 138 Queen's Avenue.  He was the patriarch and co-founder, with Angelo Dambra, of London's Italian community in 1874.  He was also the maternal grandfather of Guy Lombardo. 

A Casket of Gold

On March 5th, 1897, a celebration was held at the Grand Opera House in honour of Nicholas Wilson's 50 year of continuous teaching in London schools. On behalf of the students, Ed Flock presented Mr. Wilson with $1,000 in gold, enclosed in a silver casket.   

Pottersburg Post Office Opens

130 years ago on March 1st, 1887, a post office was established at Pottersburg, east of the city limits in London Township.  William Grray was the first postmaster.  D.F. Buchanan operated the office from his grocery store on the southwest corner of Dundas and Hale streets from May 1st, 1891 until his death on April 10th, 1923.  

No More Passenger Service

60 years ago on February 18th, 1957, passenger service was discontinued on the London and Port Stanley Railway after almost 100 years of operation.  The railway could not compete with the automobile.  The railway's service was not always reliable, earning the railroad  the nickname Late and Poor Service.   

Daylight Saving Time

Daylight saving time was inaugurated on Monday February 9th, 1942 to conserve energy for the duration of the war.