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An historical love triangle

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Along the infinite sea is Beatriz Williams' final book in the Schuyler sisters series. When I picked this book up I was simply intrigued by the story, not knowing it was part of a series. So, having not read the previous books, I can tell you that the story has no problem standing on its own.

The Schuyler sister in this particular book, Pepper, is pregnant and on the run after an affair with a married politician turns sour. In need of cash, she sells a vintage Mercedes to the mysterious Annabelle, and their two lives become intertwined.

When Annabelle disappears, her son Florian and Pepper are thrown together to solve the mystery and discover the secrets that Annabelle has been keeping for years.

Through flashbacks to wartime France and Germany, the reader follows Annabelle as she is torn between the obligations to her Nazi husband and her desire for her Jewish lover. This is the part of the book that really flourishes. It is a powerful love triangle at one of the most difficult times in history. Torn between her head and her heart, Annabelle has a huge decision to make; one that will impact the lives of several people for many years to come.

The plot immediately intrigued me and Williams definitely delivered! There was an ease to her writing that made me feel immersed in the story. This book is an epic love story and I truly cared about the characters; continuing to think about them long after finishing the last page. This was a great read and will likely appeal to a wide variety of readers. It reminded me a bit of Isabel Allende's The Japanese Lover.